DAVID BENNETT

There is only one thing I think of when I hear the word ‘rumour’, or its misspelled cousin, ‘Rumer’, in any music-based context, and that is Fleetwood Mac’s insurmountably brilliant album, ‘Rumours’. Yet, back with her third album, is… yep, it’s Rumer!

Released on Atlantic Records, ‘Into Colour’ is an album of ‘background music’ for the sophisticated ear. It’s pleasant, it’s smooth and non-offensive, it’s for a certain time and certain place – a place with soft lighting and chilled wine and warm bubble-baths (or whatever). From this perspective, it may be described as being of an acquired taste; unfortunately for me, that taste has not yet been acquired.

Jon Dennis, for the Guardian, asks (and answers his own rhetorical question), ‘Why listen to Into Colour rather than Rumer’s source material [the 1970s pop songs she emulates]? … these are memorable songs, recorder with exquisite taste.’ Well, my question would be, ‘why write and record an entire album based unashamedly on mimicry?’

timthumb.php

There are some sweet elements of soft 70s disco and Rumer has a distinctly Dusty Springfield/Karen Carpenter vibe going on, which could never be a bad thing, but it’s all just a bit ‘middle of the road’ (I believe it is referred to as ‘easy listening’). Rumer clearly delivers some songs with unadulterated emotion – ‘Butterfly’, for example, deals with the heartbreak of miscarriage – but, purely as a listening experience, it would be a rare occasion on which this album would be a suitable choice. Perhaps I’ll play this album again, and love it, when I’ve settled down and started wearing slippers more often than Jordans, but those are distant times.

Nevertheless, I can appreciate well made, well performed, well written music, and if a quaint, retro revival is what you’re looking for, ‘Into Colour’ is the album for you.

A middle-of-the-road, 5 out of 10!